QNAP TS-464

How to replace a drive in QNAP NAS

A storage drive will eventually fail inside a NAS, it’s only a matter of when. To remedy this situation, we’d need to replace the dead drive with a new one to continue using the NAS with full storage capacity and performance. Thankfully, the process is an easy one and this guide will run you through how to do so with or without RAID.

How to replace a drive in QNAP NAS

The process of replacing a drive in QNAP’s QTS differs depending on the type of RAID used on your NAS enclosure. I’ll start with RAID 0, which is essentially running the enclosure without any form of RAID.

RAID 0

Warning

Following these steps will delete all the stored data on the NAS. I recommend backing up your NAS before moving forward. However, this guide assumes you already have an available backup due to the data loss.

  1. Log into your QNAP NAS.
  2. Remove the faulty drive from the bay. (The NAS will beep twice.)
  3. Insert a replacement drive. (The NAS will beep twice.)
  4. Go to Control Panel > System.
  5. Select Backup/Restore.
  6. Select Restore to Factory Default.
  7. Click Reinitialize NAS.
  8. Restart the NAS.
  9. Restore the backed-up data.

RAID 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, 60

  1. Log into your QNAP NAS.
  2. Remove the faulty drive from the bay. (The NAS will beep twice.)
  3. Insert a replacement drive. (The NAS will beep twice.)
  4. Go to Storage & Snapshots > Storage > Disks/VJBOD.

If the drive doesn’t change to “Rebuilding,” you may need to manually configure the newly installed drive as a spare. Please see the process on Setting a spare drive in QNAP QTS for details.

Setting a spare drive in QNAP QTS

QNAP TS-253E
Easily removing the two QNAP TS-253E bays. (Source: NM)

It’s possible to reserve a drive inside a QNAP NAS for use as a replacement should a drive fail. While this would limit the available capacity through the loss of a drive, it does allow the OS to automatically migrate the spare drive into the array and rebuild the RAID.

  1. Insert a drive into the QNAP NAS. (The NAS will beep twice.)
  2. Go to Storage & Snapshots > Storage > Disks/VJBOD.
  3. Click the spare disk.
  4. Select Action > Set as Enclosure Spare.
  5. Click OK.

Choosing the best NAS drives

To lessen the chance of an early drive failure, I’d always recommend the use of a storage drive designed for NAS. I’ve rounded up the best NAS drives for enclosures, some of which are backed by warranties that last almost half a decade. Even the best QNAP NAS can experience a drive failure during its lifetime, which is why it’s important to take steps to shield yourself against data loss.

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